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Published On: Tue, Mar 20th, 2018

From dairy products to sugary treats: Dietitian reveals the foods that can trigger a breakout – and what you should eat more of to make your skin glow

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By Sheree Mutton

If you suffer from acne, you may want to look at changing up your diet.
According to dietitian Lyndi Cohen, the food we eat, and our eating habits, have a direct impact on our skin’s health – especially if you have ‘problematic’ skin.
While there is still debate on whether certain foods directly cause acne, some can trigger hormonal fluctuations and inflammation – leading to breakouts.
FEMAIL spoke to Lyndi for some expert tips on the foods we should be avoiding and the ones that can help us achieve clearer, healthier skin. ’Problem skin usually develops in response to hormonal changes, which is why teenagers tend to be more prone to breakouts,’ Lyndi said.
The main reason this occurs is because androgen hormones tend to spike in puberty, which can cause sebaceous glands to become enlarged and produce excess oils.
This in turn clog pores, which can result in pimples. But the dietitian explained as people get older, a combination of factors, including diet, can also lead to hormonal issues.
‘Drinking too much alcohol, stress, not enough sleep and eating highly processed, sugary and fatty food will not be good news for your blood sugar levels, mood or skin, hair and nails.’ That means if you are trying to manage breakouts, it’s worth taking a closer look at what you eat.
One of the main triggers for acne is inflammation, which means white bread may be something you may want to look at removing from your diet.
Some studies have revealed a link between gluten and those who suffer acne because gluten sensitivity can show as skin problem.
To assess if this could be the cause of your breakouts, speak to a dietitian to see if a gluten-free diet could work for you. If flare-ups are a persistent problem, processed or refined carbs including bread, pastries, white pasta and white rice and potato chips should also be avoided.
Instead, Lyndi recommends trying to including whole grains and slow-burning carbohydrates in your diet.
‘These include foods such as oats, chickpeas, lentils and beans, quinoa, brown rice, sweet potato and corn,’ she said.
‘They will help stabilise your blood sugar levels and prevent the highs and lows that can contribute to acne and cause skin redness.’ Sugar is another common trigger for people with acne, and is best avoided, the dietitian suggested.
This is because steep insulin spikes increase the production of oils and contribute to the clogging of follicles.
Although there is ongoing debate as to whether eating chocolate can exacerbate breakouts, a study published in the Journal of theAmerican Academy of Dermatology found that ‘chocolate consumption caused more inflammation.’ Chocolate is a a high sugar/high fat food that can increase the body’s sebum production, which then can create inflammatory responses in the body.
If your skin issues are related to hormonal problems, minimising dairy could also be beneficial.
Milk contains components related to the hormone testosterone.
In some people this can stimulate oil glands in the skin, which can in turn set the stage for blocked pores and pimples.
As well staying away form problem foods, Lyndi also recommends taking a probiotic daily to boost your skin health.
‘Probiotics help your body buffer from free-radical damage [caused by smoke and pollution],’ she said.
‘By boosting your gut health, you might also notice an improvement in your skin.’
The main reason this occurs is because androgen hormones tend to spike in puberty, which can cause sebaceous glands to become enlarged and produce excess oils.
This in turn clog pores, which can result in pimples. But the dietitian explained as people get older, a combination of factors, including diet, can also lead to hormonal issues.
‘Drinking too much alcohol, stress, not enough sleep and eating highly processed, sugary and fatty food will not be good news for your blood sugar levels, mood or skin, hair and nails.’ That means if you are trying to manage breakouts, it’s worth taking a closer look at what you eat.
One of the main triggers for acne is inflammation, which means white bread may be something you may want to look at removing from your diet.

Source: Dailymail.com
Some studies have revealed a link between gluten and those who suffer acne because gluten sensitivity can show as skin problem.

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