Published On: Wed, May 22nd, 2019

Between Buhari govt and PDP (1)

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WEDNESDAY COLUMN by USSIJU MEDANER

info@medaner.com | justme4justice@yahoo.com

It is necessary that we set some records straight concerning the APC-led Buhari Administration. It is almost unnecessary to continue to respond to PDP regular outbursts since it makes no sense to argue with a bobblehead because people might eventually find it difficult to distinguish who the real clodpoll is.
Within a span of three days, Uche Secondus, while speaking for PDP in their characteristic pattern, chose to ignore both the truth and reality as well as distort facts when he made incriminating outburst against the administration of President Muhammadu Buhari on issues of security and competence. Rather than taking up an argument with Mr Secondus, I have chosen the path of reminding Nigerians on the state of insecurity in Nigeria as well as the index of determining the competence of a government.
The major problem we have with security challenges in Nigeria aside the menace itself is the deliberate selective reportage of the problem. The security challenges facing Nigeria today are far beyond the operations of Boko Haram, and Bandits attacks.
Each and every semblance of Boko Haram or bandits ’ attacks is naturally given so much publicity by the major media houses but they turn a blind eye to the killings of Nigerians in several other states that are not related to Boko Haram and Fulani herders’ attacks. When a crime is committed, the criminal should be blamed. Whenever terrorism and heinous crimes occur in other country, especially the developed world, they come together and condemn the attacks blaming the criminals for the attacks. They do not totally accuse their security agencies for the actions of criminals . This is unlike the situation here in our country where the blame for the occurrence of any criminal act goes to the security agencies. It is important to understand the demographic factors associated to any particular crime.
To begin with considering the nature of policing, in Nigeria, it is still analogue when the world is already moving towards smart-policing. Secondly, the budgetary allocation to the police by successive governments is another determinant of how effective the police would be. There is the issue of the ratio of active policemen to the entire population: Nigeria has a population of about 200 million people with only about 300 thousand police officers. This makes it difficult for the police to effectively check crimes before they occur coupled with the fact that the operations of the police are analogue. Despite this challenge, the security agencies have manually captured several of the villains and more are being captured daily. Again in any society, there is the tendency for delinquency within the percentage population and the percentage may run into millions of individuals. The truth remains no matter how many people are arrested, there are more people within the set that are liable to engage in the crime.
This is the only government which has enforced the recruitment of policemen in tens of thousands. First, 10,000 police officers were recruited and then 15,000 and 30,000 respectively. This is to ease the burden on the police in maintaining law and order within the country. In addition to this, the bill for police trust fund has been passed to meet the funding gap of the police in carrying out their functions and also their salaries increased.
Let’s look at the cultists activities in River State, none of the vocal television stations and radio houses that are at the front of broadcasting insurgent killings around Nigeria has deemed the killings in Rivers State newsworthy. I wonder why this much selective reportage? Could it be that it is normal for Rivers people to kill themselves? Or is it that reporting it by the news media platforms would castigate the government of the state? If it were an alleged ‘Fulani herders’ attack in Rivers State, would both the media houses and even Mr Secondus pretend it is not happening?
Early in 2018, the killings in Benue and Plateau states were the major news ingredient in Nigeria. The major media houses were having a field day reporting and analysing, with the ultimate intention of exposing and smearing the sitting president by painting him as being both incompetent and nonchalant to the plight of the people. Today, no one seems to be hearing any news from the two states any longer; is it that they now enjoy absolute peace? Some weeks ago, some indigenes of Benue State disguised as Fulani men invaded a settlement and killed few people. The news was not given the usual Fulani attacks publicity probably because of its capacity to puncture the concept of Fulani attacks in the state and give credence to the unpopular theory of political sabotage under the guise of external attacks. The truth is that there are still pockets of attacks that cannot be linked to their preferred sources of interest so they are considered as normal.
As reported by mainstream media recently “ while on a clandestine visit to Aso Villa ……., Governor Samuel Ortom cunningly and deliberately failed to finger Fulani herdsmen and Miyetti Allah Kautal Hore in the Benue attacks, as it has always been his trademark but preferred to blame one Terwase Akwaza a.k.a “Gana” who once worked with his government as “Tax Consultant” as the kingpin of attacks in Benue; alleging further that the said “Gana” was trained by Boko Haram.
Just last week, Governor Samuel Ortom accused the Tiv people of Ukum of attacking and killing Jukun people of Kente and other settlements in Taraba State, ordering the Ukum Council Chairman and Traditional Rulers from the area to produce the attackers in three days.
The governor has a legendary history of shifting blames on people and circumstances without owning up to his failures or actions and inactions.”
God Bless The Federal Republic Of Nigeria.

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